Archive

Our Criminal Past

‘Our Criminal Past’ is an interdisciplinary research network of UK-based stakeholders who are working academically and/or professionally in the field of the criminal, legal and penal history of Britain.

The creation of the network was in recognition of the growing importance of ‘our criminal past’, not only to academics but also to archivists, heritage professionals, educationalists and others in the wider community who have an investment in how our criminal past is to be preserved, presented and transmitted. Three inter-related themes have been identified as important areas of cross and multidisciplinary interest in terms of previous, current and future research that have contemporary and cultural significance beyond the academia. These are: Digitisation: Social Media and Crime History; Educating Historians of Crime: Classroom, Archive, Community; and Representing Penal Histories: Displaying and Narrating our Criminal Past.

Our series of network events brought together experts from a range of disciplines, including history, criminology, education, tourism and cultural studies, with archivists and those engaged in an educational and heritage capacity in museums and prisons. The events were a forum for discussion and debate about future strategic research planning and collaborations, the sustainability of research in relation to new technology and funding streams, and the role of individuals, communities and institutions in shaping and preserving our criminal past. Through the sharing of expertise and good practice, we explored ideas that would lead to new projects in the history of crime, thus ‘Caring for the Future’ of the history of crime.

 

Key Contacts

Professor Helen Johnston, University of Hull: h.johnston@hull.ac.uk

Professor Heather Shore, Leeds Beckett University: h.shore@leedsbackett.ac.uk

 

Events

Event 1: Our Criminal Past: Digitisation, Social Media and Crime History, London Metropolitan Archives, 17 May 2013

Event 2: Our Criminal Past: Educating Historians of Crime: Classroom, Archive, Community, Broadcasting Place, Leeds Beckett University, 6 September 2013

Event 3: Our Criminal Past: Representing Penal Histories: Displaying and Narrating the Criminal Past, Galleries of Justice, Nottingham, 31 January 2014

Latest Updates on Twitter

Our asylum team continues the story of Orlando Bridgeman, as concern grows at the family home of Weston Hall when letters about his condition continue to arrive. Read more https://staffordshireasylumrecords.wordpress.com/patients/ #staffsasylums (image Weston Hall, County Archaeology Dept/staffspasttrack.org.uk)

This 1872 drawing by the City Engineer William Mackison is a design proposal for a cattle market and abattoir at East Dock Street. A cattle market was built there but to different designs.

#Dundee #Archives

Whistling Willie was a Perth eccentric who was renowned for his obsession with the Glovers' Michaelmas dinner. Whenever he was asked, he could immediately answer how many days there were until the next dinner.

This photograph of Willie was taken by Magnus Jackson c. 1880.

Browns Castle also known as The Black Dog prison. Notorious smuggler and Privateer Luke Ryan escaped here in 1779. He seized back control of his vessel, picked up his crew at Rush and sailed for the smugglers haven of Dunkirk to later embark on a prolific career as privateer.

Hear unique insights and stories from The National Archives’ records and learn about the long history of public health responses in Britain. How did outbreaks from the past affect real people and how did they change Britain? #PodcastRecommendations

https://media.nationalarchives.gov.uk/index.php/public-health-crises-exploring-britains-medical-history/

** Small bit of paid work available **

I'm looking for someone who can decipher (if possible) the form of shorthand used in these two manuscripts. I *think* they are in the hand of Edwin Chadwick, and they deal with the elderly Jeremy Bentham's ailing health

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Did your ancestors have a 'Fleet Marriage'? Up until the first half of the 18th century, irregular or clandestine marriages were much more common that you might think! https://bit.ly/37jFx2K
#AncestryHour #Genealogy #Marriage
Image: Caricature of a Fleet Marriage (Wikipedia)

We continue to mark the life and achievements of Hull aviator Amy Johnson by releasing Part 4 of her letters which are now available to view online. These cover April 1927 to Whitsun 1927 http://hullhistorycentre.org.uk/research/research-guides/amy-johnson-letters.aspx @hull_libraries @jrlthull @Hull_Museums