Archive

Our Criminal Past

‘Our Criminal Past’ is an interdisciplinary research network of UK-based stakeholders who are working academically and/or professionally in the field of the criminal, legal and penal history of Britain.

The creation of the network was in recognition of the growing importance of ‘our criminal past’, not only to academics but also to archivists, heritage professionals, educationalists and others in the wider community who have an investment in how our criminal past is to be preserved, presented and transmitted. Three inter-related themes have been identified as important areas of cross and multidisciplinary interest in terms of previous, current and future research that have contemporary and cultural significance beyond the academia. These are: Digitisation: Social Media and Crime History; Educating Historians of Crime: Classroom, Archive, Community; and Representing Penal Histories: Displaying and Narrating our Criminal Past.

Our series of network events brought together experts from a range of disciplines, including history, criminology, education, tourism and cultural studies, with archivists and those engaged in an educational and heritage capacity in museums and prisons. The events were a forum for discussion and debate about future strategic research planning and collaborations, the sustainability of research in relation to new technology and funding streams, and the role of individuals, communities and institutions in shaping and preserving our criminal past. Through the sharing of expertise and good practice, we explored ideas that would lead to new projects in the history of crime, thus ‘Caring for the Future’ of the history of crime.

 

Key Contacts

Professor Helen Johnston, University of Hull: h.johnston@hull.ac.uk

Professor Heather Shore, Leeds Beckett University: h.shore@leedsbackett.ac.uk

 

Events

Event 1: Our Criminal Past: Digitisation, Social Media and Crime History, London Metropolitan Archives, 17 May 2013

Event 2: Our Criminal Past: Educating Historians of Crime: Classroom, Archive, Community, Broadcasting Place, Leeds Beckett University, 6 September 2013

Event 3: Our Criminal Past: Representing Penal Histories: Displaying and Narrating the Criminal Past, Galleries of Justice, Nottingham, 31 January 2014

Latest Updates on Twitter

The 3D model of Aylestone Meadows created by @leicspolice PC Pat O’Conner (a hobbyist model maker), which aided in the 1983 investigation into the murder of Caroline Osborne. @CCLeicsPolice @LPSpecialistSup @BritPoliceHist @PolHisSoc1985

I wrote this a week or so ago, I hadn’t realised it would be published on the first full day Johnson and his gang silenced our democracy https://t.co/dY0ADxTjwP

⁦@WMPHistory⁩⁩ looking forward to reading the latest addition to my bookshelf or perhaps a commute read - more great work from our resident ⁦@WMPolice⁩ ⁦heritage authors @Kenco_Mojo⁩ ⁦@museumcop⁩ πŸ‘

Hmmm.... my turn...

Potential Suffragette bullets which were sent to Lloyd George. I’m still working on the definitive providence, but looks likely 🀞

Leader of our Lived Welfare State team, Professor Pirjo Markkola spoke yesterday at a panel "How historians can assist in historic child abuse inquiries" in London. The interest on the matter has grown in many countries. https://t.co/fMASAZ8lm2

Domestic production and work in poor British homes, c.1650-1850 conference is this Thursday! Hashtag for the day will be #DomesticWorkDerby - Please do follow and tweet!

How best to use digital resources in student learning ?? Great techniques by @Adam_Crymble at
#NewToTeaching workshop in Manchester @RoyalHistSoc @history_uk - could be a good session for @lsehistory phd training seminar @TanyaHarmer

There's still time to join our free online course #PeterlootothePankhursts on @FutureLearn, developed with @PHMMcr and bursting with engaging content from @UkNatArchives, @UKParlArchives and @HistParl. Sign up here: https://t.co/8FrCG5q13b