Journal

March 2015 saw the online publication of the Our Criminal Past special issue of Law, Crime and History.

We are indebted to the authors for their contributions, and to Kim Stevenson and Judith Rowbotham for their support of the network.

Law, Crime and History, Volume 5, Issue 1 (2015), Special Edition: Our Criminal Past – Caring for the Future

Guest Editors: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston

 

Contents:

Preface: Barry Godfrey, pp.1-4

Introduction: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston, ‘Thinking about the Future of Our Criminal Past’, pp.5-11

Digital Histories of Crime

Sharon Howard, ‘Bloody Code: Reflecting on a Decade of the Old Bailey Online and the Digital Futures of Our Criminal Past’, pp.12-24

Hamish Maxwell Stewart, Matthew Cracknell, and Kris Inwood, ‘Height, Crime and Colonial History’, pp.25-42

Blogging Crime Histories

Lucy Williams, ‘Writing Wayward Women: Why Blog the History of Victorian England’s Female Offenders?’ pp.43-53

Helen Rogers, ‘Blogging Our Criminal Past: Social Media, Public Engagement and Creative History’, pp.54-76

Teaching Digital History

Zoe Alker, ‘The Digital Classroom: New Social Media and Teaching Victorian Crime’, pp.77-92

Andrew Davies, Mark Peel and Laura Balderstone, ‘Digital Histories of Crime and Research-Based Teaching and Learning’, pp.93-104

Presenting Crime and Policing Histories

Beth Wilburn, ‘Narrating ‘Our Criminal Past’ at Greater Manchester Police Museum and Archives in the Context of the UK Government Funded Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP) 2009-2011’, pp.105-116

Dorian Knight, ‘On the Beat: Stories from 1914-1918: A Fresh Approach to interpreting Crime History at Bishop’s Stortford Museum’, pp.117-129

Debate and Discussion

Richard W. Ireland, ‘Why Everything We Know About Criminal Justice History is Wrong’, pp.130-142

Book Reviews

David J. Cox, ‘An Eye For An Eye: A Global History of Crime and Punishment’, pp.143-144

Judith Rowbotham, ‘Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England’, pp.145-148

Dean Wilson, Policing Twentieth Century Ireland: A History of An Garda Síochána, pp.149-151

Law, Crime & History

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The recording of our recent Wilberforce Institute Debate - 'Not Made By Slaves' - is now available through our channel if you missed it. Hosted jointly with @FreetownSociety and the @UniOfHull, it discusses the recent monograph by @BronwenEverill. Click ➡️ https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/6211628678705217026

Half the tickets are sold already! If you want to join me making embroidered images, please book soon. https://twitter.com/CriminalQuilts/status/1305902239630921728

The 1916 leader Eamon Ceannt was born on this day, 21 September, 1881. He was very active in the Gaelic revival and played the uillean pipes. When performing he sometimes wore a traditional Irish costume which included a sporran, now in the Kilmainham Gaol collection.

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