Journal

March 2015 saw the online publication of the Our Criminal Past special issue of Law, Crime and History.

We are indebted to the authors for their contributions, and to Kim Stevenson and Judith Rowbotham for their support of the network.

Law, Crime and History, Volume 5, Issue 1 (2015), Special Edition: Our Criminal Past – Caring for the Future

Guest Editors: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston

 

Contents:

Preface: Barry Godfrey, pp.1-4

Introduction: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston, ‘Thinking about the Future of Our Criminal Past’, pp.5-11

Digital Histories of Crime

Sharon Howard, ‘Bloody Code: Reflecting on a Decade of the Old Bailey Online and the Digital Futures of Our Criminal Past’, pp.12-24

Hamish Maxwell Stewart, Matthew Cracknell, and Kris Inwood, ‘Height, Crime and Colonial History’, pp.25-42

Blogging Crime Histories

Lucy Williams, ‘Writing Wayward Women: Why Blog the History of Victorian England’s Female Offenders?’ pp.43-53

Helen Rogers, ‘Blogging Our Criminal Past: Social Media, Public Engagement and Creative History’, pp.54-76

Teaching Digital History

Zoe Alker, ‘The Digital Classroom: New Social Media and Teaching Victorian Crime’, pp.77-92

Andrew Davies, Mark Peel and Laura Balderstone, ‘Digital Histories of Crime and Research-Based Teaching and Learning’, pp.93-104

Presenting Crime and Policing Histories

Beth Wilburn, ‘Narrating ‘Our Criminal Past’ at Greater Manchester Police Museum and Archives in the Context of the UK Government Funded Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP) 2009-2011’, pp.105-116

Dorian Knight, ‘On the Beat: Stories from 1914-1918: A Fresh Approach to interpreting Crime History at Bishop’s Stortford Museum’, pp.117-129

Debate and Discussion

Richard W. Ireland, ‘Why Everything We Know About Criminal Justice History is Wrong’, pp.130-142

Book Reviews

David J. Cox, ‘An Eye For An Eye: A Global History of Crime and Punishment’, pp.143-144

Judith Rowbotham, ‘Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England’, pp.145-148

Dean Wilson, Policing Twentieth Century Ireland: A History of An Garda Síochána, pp.149-151

Law, Crime & History

Latest Updates on Twitter

Researching your prison ancestors: an introductory guide - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/researching-your-prison-ancestors-an-introductory-guide/

Tracing your police ancestors - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/police-ancestors/

Where to find criminal justice system records - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/where-to-find-criminal-justice-system-records/

Types of 'employment' & wages of prisoners in #Ripon House of Correction in 1872. Oakum picking had been introduced by the Governor, William Smith (formerly Sgt of the Ripon Police) in 1863. #NorthYorkshire @ourcriminalpast @prisonhistoryuk @CaPnetworkUK

@MAMBarLife @ourcriminalpast Yes. Ideally no windows, though some had small windows or grates for ventilation. Box Blind House is a true blind house - they managed to put the ventilation in the chimney https://tinyurl.com/eju6un9w

Finding a burial record is an important part of tracing your ancestor's story. Here's how to search the records of local cemeteries online

https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/tutorials/cemetery-records-online/

1. Another in our #LostPrisonsofDublin series. "New Newgate" opened in 1781 to replace "Old Newgate", the medieval city prison located in Cornmarket. Designed by Thomas Cooley, it was quickly seen as out-dated and overcrowded with poor ventilation and sanitation. (image DCC)

2

Although the Met had detectives from 1842, when the painter William Frith wanted 2 real life officers as models for his depiction of an arrest (right), he used Michael Haydon and James Brett of the City of London Police, 2 of the finest thief takers of the day #AVeryBritishMurder