Journal

March 2015 saw the online publication of the Our Criminal Past special issue of Law, Crime and History.

We are indebted to the authors for their contributions, and to Kim Stevenson and Judith Rowbotham for their support of the network.

Law, Crime and History, Volume 5, Issue 1 (2015), Special Edition: Our Criminal Past – Caring for the Future

Guest Editors: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston

 

Contents:

Preface: Barry Godfrey, pp.1-4

Introduction: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston, ‘Thinking about the Future of Our Criminal Past’, pp.5-11

Digital Histories of Crime

Sharon Howard, ‘Bloody Code: Reflecting on a Decade of the Old Bailey Online and the Digital Futures of Our Criminal Past’, pp.12-24

Hamish Maxwell Stewart, Matthew Cracknell, and Kris Inwood, ‘Height, Crime and Colonial History’, pp.25-42

Blogging Crime Histories

Lucy Williams, ‘Writing Wayward Women: Why Blog the History of Victorian England’s Female Offenders?’ pp.43-53

Helen Rogers, ‘Blogging Our Criminal Past: Social Media, Public Engagement and Creative History’, pp.54-76

Teaching Digital History

Zoe Alker, ‘The Digital Classroom: New Social Media and Teaching Victorian Crime’, pp.77-92

Andrew Davies, Mark Peel and Laura Balderstone, ‘Digital Histories of Crime and Research-Based Teaching and Learning’, pp.93-104

Presenting Crime and Policing Histories

Beth Wilburn, ‘Narrating ‘Our Criminal Past’ at Greater Manchester Police Museum and Archives in the Context of the UK Government Funded Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP) 2009-2011’, pp.105-116

Dorian Knight, ‘On the Beat: Stories from 1914-1918: A Fresh Approach to interpreting Crime History at Bishop’s Stortford Museum’, pp.117-129

Debate and Discussion

Richard W. Ireland, ‘Why Everything We Know About Criminal Justice History is Wrong’, pp.130-142

Book Reviews

David J. Cox, ‘An Eye For An Eye: A Global History of Crime and Punishment’, pp.143-144

Judith Rowbotham, ‘Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England’, pp.145-148

Dean Wilson, Policing Twentieth Century Ireland: A History of An Garda Síochána, pp.149-151

Law, Crime & History

Latest Updates on Twitter

In 1871 Ripon #Yorkshire magistrates appointed 'Annie Ada Smyth as schoolmistress at the House of Correction, at a salary of £1 per quarter.
' 3 years later they advetised for a male warder. @Police_Gazette @BD1policemuseum @BritPoliceHist @ourcriminalpast @RiponTogether

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Congratulations to Natalie Craig who graduated last July from our History programme at Edge Hill University. She has been awarded the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire's undergraduate dissertation prize for her work on Lancaster Moor Asylum!!

@nidderdaleuk @Pateley_Bridge @ourcriminalpast J. Keighley Snowden, one time 'Keighley News' journalist, wrote two books about Jack Sinkler, Nidderdale Poacher. 'King Jack' 1914, 'Jack The Outlaw' 1926. Snowden talked to Sinkler over three years to get his story. @nidderdaleuk @Pateley_Bridge @ourcriminalpast @KeighleyLHS

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Did you enjoy the start to series two of the On The Record podcast?

Follow up with more medieval goodness about the Peasants' Revolt, England's first popular uprising on the blog today: http://socsi.in/KsUcI

Don't forget to subscribe to #OnTheRecord for future episodes! 🎧

A selection of menus for children taken from a leaflet entitled 'The feeding of children from one to five years' which was published by the Ministry of Health in March 1942. From the National Union of Railwaymen archive. https://cdm21047.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/health/id/1506/rec/15 #historyoffood #historyofhealth

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The Examination Letter for John Shore, who eventually worked on the 1888 Whitechapel Murder Case (aka Jack the Ripper) as an Inspector, before retiring as Supt from Scotland Yard in 1896 becoming Pinkerton Agent for London. His descendant is a resident of Leicestershire.

Shown on a tour today: plan of the Quaker Workhouse on River Street, #Bristol, surveyed in 1861 - exciting to see 19th century hand-coloured plans in such pristine condition #behindthescenes #archivetours (Catalogue: http://archives.bristol.gov.uk/Record.aspx?src=CalmView.Catalog&id=SF%2fPl%2f18) ^et/ad

Unknown vessel (1920s-1930s?) discharging cargo into lighters (note the dusting of white on the hull). Location unknown. Junkshop photo (Chelmsford).

'Every offender, who, for any first or second-rate crime, suffers ignominious punishment, shall, all the time that he is undergoing the said punishment, wear the cap of ignominy.