May 17, 2013

Our Criminal Past: Digitisation, Social Media and Crime History, London Metropolitan Archives

Programme

10:00-10:15 Refreshments and Opening Remarks

10:15-12:00 Session 1: Digitising Crime and Penal Histories

Tim Hitchcock, ‘Digitising Criminal Justice: Past, Present and Future’

Sharon Howard, ‘Bloody Code: Reflecting on a Decade of Old Bailey Online and the Digital Future of Our Criminal Past’

Hamish Maxwell Stewart, ‘Founders and Survivors: Using Digital Technologies to Explore the Long Run Impact of Convict Transportation’

(Chair and Commentator: Pam Cox)

12:00-13:15 Lunch

13:15-15:00 Session 2: Historians of Crime and Social Media

Zoe Alker, ‘Using New Social Media Technologies in Teaching Victorian Crime’

Adam Crymble, ‘How Blogging and Tweeting Make Me a Better Historian of Crime’

Lesley Hulonce, ‘From the Local to the Global: Victorian Child Poverty and Crime on the Blogosphere’

Lucy Williams, ‘Writing WaywardWomen: A Digital Discussion of the History of Female Offending’

(Chair and Commentator: John Carter Wood)

15:00-15:15 Comfort Break

15:15-16:00 Session 3: Roundtable – Current Challenges and New Directions

Speakers: Barry Godfrey, Liz Hore (National Archives), Helen Rogers

Event Reviews:

Event Review by Dr Jo Turner

Event Review by Dr Zoe Alker, Liverpool John Moores University

Latest Updates on Twitter

The only known photo of 'Jack' Sinkler, Nidderdale poacher, outlaw and legend. The photo can be seen in the Nidderdale Museum, the old Pateley Workhouse, where he spent the last six months of his life. @nidderdaleuk @Pateley_Bridge @ourcriminalpast

For anyone feeling that 2020 is so far lacking discussion of medieval law and disorder, Year Books and Welsh praise poetry, I have a new article out: 'Judging a Hereford hanging: Agnes Glover v. Walter Devereux, William Herbert and others, 1457' https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0047729X.2020.1712077

Our blog is the Social History Exchange. We see it as a digital version of our conference, continuing the discussion all year round. We're starting the New Year with a daily run-down of the ten most popular posts from 2019. Think of it as a reverse advent for #twitterstorians

Happy new year to our followers! This is a reminder that our CFP deadline is in NINE DAYS! Feel free to contact the organisers with any queries, we are keen to hear from a variety of scholars and their research
#MWC20 #histpsych #twitterstorians

We start with a tie for joint ninth place. The first is Michael Schoeppner’s ‘Black Sailors and Legal History from the Bottom Up’ which explains the writing process behind the author’s prize-winning book on citizenship in Antebellum America:

https://socialhistory.org.uk/shs_exchange/black-sailors-and-legal-history-from-the-bottom-up/

🐎 This is a Hansom Cab, created by Joseph Hansom in 1834 who lived in Micklegate. It was a popular new form of transport as the large wheels meant it was safer travelling at high speeds, and still only needed to be pulled by one horse, making it an affordable form of transport!

This murky photo of the Thames towards Westminster Abbey is an incredibly interesting & early view of London, when the Houses of Parliament didn't exist. It was taken by Fox Talbot in June 1841 from his flat in Cecil Street. Parliament had burned to the ground in October 1834

At the outbreak of the second Boer War, former Metropolitan Police Commissioner during the Ripper scare, Sir Charles Warren, returned to South Africa as a General. This photo shows a wounded Sir Charles receiving treatment at the disastrous Battle of Spion Kop, 1900.

#NewYear new job? We have a range of vacancies at York Museums Trust including two Relationship Managers and an Assistant Curator.

Find out more here > https://www.yorkmuseumstrust.org.uk/about-us/our-people/jobvacancies/ #York #Jobs #Arts