Articles

Historical perspectives on imprisonment – part 2

May 26, 2020

The latest Prison Service Journal is the second in a series of special editions offering historical perspectives on a range of prison and criminal justice issues.

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Historical perspectives on imprisonment

November 20, 2019

The latest issue of the Prison Service Journal features articles offering a historical perspective on various aspects of imprisonment, reaching from penal reform to prison financing systems.

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Petitioning for mercy in mid-nineteenth century Yorkshire

May 14, 2019

This article, by Dick Hunter, examines petitions for clemency in Yorkshire courts in the mid-nineteenth century, with a case study of Sarah Ann Hill, who was sentenced to death for the murder of her new-born child in 1851 but whose sentence was commuted to transportation.

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Disability and the Victorian prison

May 14, 2019

Prof Helen Johnston and Dr Jo Turner examine what life was like for the disabled prisoner in the nineteenth century convict system.

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Convict prison lives in Victorian London

April 24, 2018

Helen Johnston, Barry Godfrey and David Cox look at convict prison lives in Victorian London.

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school boys football team

‘Beyond the control of his parents’: Reformatory and Industrial Schools in Yorkshire

April 11, 2018

An overview of the work of reformatory and industrial schools, which were established as a response to a perceived increase in juvenile crime in the nineteenth century.

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soldiers in a first world war trench

Borstal goes to war

April 11, 2014

Among the many combatants who fought during the First World War, a sizeable number had been in penal institutions before the outbreak of the conflict.

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On the beat: stories from 1914-1918

April 11, 2014

A fresh approach to interpreting crime history at Bishop’s Stortford Museum.

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costumed interpreters on a Victorian Street

Stockton’s criminal past: promoting a museum’s criminal history collection

April 11, 2014

Take a look at Preston Park Museum’s own criminal history collection.

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woman using a laptop

Event review by Dr Zoe Alker, Liverpool John Moores University

May 17, 2013

The first AHRC ‘Our Criminal Past’ network event at the London Metropolitan Archives.

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‘Closing and Opening Prisons’

April 11, 2013

A special issue of the Prison Service Journal explores the impact of closures and openings of prisons on those involved in the system.

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Researching your prison ancestors: an introductory guide - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/researching-your-prison-ancestors-an-introductory-guide/

Tracing your police ancestors - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/police-ancestors/

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Types of 'employment' & wages of prisoners in #Ripon House of Correction in 1872. Oakum picking had been introduced by the Governor, William Smith (formerly Sgt of the Ripon Police) in 1863. #NorthYorkshire @ourcriminalpast @prisonhistoryuk @CaPnetworkUK

@MAMBarLife @ourcriminalpast Yes. Ideally no windows, though some had small windows or grates for ventilation. Box Blind House is a true blind house - they managed to put the ventilation in the chimney https://tinyurl.com/eju6un9w

Finding a burial record is an important part of tracing your ancestor's story. Here's how to search the records of local cemeteries online

https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/tutorials/cemetery-records-online/

1. Another in our #LostPrisonsofDublin series. "New Newgate" opened in 1781 to replace "Old Newgate", the medieval city prison located in Cornmarket. Designed by Thomas Cooley, it was quickly seen as out-dated and overcrowded with poor ventilation and sanitation. (image DCC)

2

Although the Met had detectives from 1842, when the painter William Frith wanted 2 real life officers as models for his depiction of an arrest (right), he used Michael Haydon and James Brett of the City of London Police, 2 of the finest thief takers of the day #AVeryBritishMurder