Further reading

Books – Family History

Hawkings, David T. Criminal Ancestors: A Guide to Historic Criminal Records in England and Wales (Sutton Publishing, 1996).

Limbrick, Gudrun Jane. How to Research Childhoods Spent in Former Children’s Homes, Orphanages, Cottage Homes and Other Children’s Institutions (Wordworks, 2013).

Wade, Stephen. Tracing Your Criminal Ancestors: A Guide for Family Historians (Pen and Sword, 2009).

 

Books – Historical Context

Brown, Alyson. English Society and the Prison (The Boydell Press, 2003).

Cox, David J. Crime in England, 1688-1815 (Routledge, 2014).

Emsley, Clive. Crime and Society in England, 1750-1900 (Pearson, 2005); The English Police (Routledge, 1991); Crime and Society in Twentieth-Century England (Pearson, 2011).

Gray, Drew. Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1660-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2016).

Johnston, Helen. Crime in England, 1815-1880 (Routledge, 2015).

Sharpe, James A. Crime in Early Modern England 1550-1750 (Longman, 1998).

Shore, Heather. Artful Dodgers: Youth and Crime in Early Nineteenth-Century London (Boydell Press, 1999).

Taylor, David. Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1750-1914 (Palgrave, 1998); Hooligans, Harlots, and Hangmen: Crime and Punishment in Victorian Britain (Praeger, 2010).

 

Online

The National Archives: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

  • From the homepage click “Help with your research” then click “Criminals, courts and prisons”.

The Old Bailey Online: www.oldbaileyonline.org

The Digital Panopticon: www.digitalpanopticon.org

WaywardWomen: www.waywardwomen.wordpress.com

Africans in Yorkshire: www.africansinyorkshireproject.com

Children’s Homes: www.childrenshomes.org.uk

Former Children’s Homes: www.formerchildrenshomes.org.uk

The Workhouse: www.workhouses.org.uk

 

PhD theses

Balchin, Andrew. ‘The Justice of the Peace and County Government in the East Riding of Yorkshire, 1782-1836’ (Unpublished PhD Thesis, 1990). Available: https://hydra.hull.ac.uk/resources/hull:3760

Welsh, David. ‘The Reform of Urban Policing in Victorian England: A Study of Kingston upon Hull from 1836 to 1866’ (Unpublished PhD Thesis, 1997). Available: https://hydra.hull.ac.uk/resources/hull:4701

Latest Updates on Twitter

Researching your prison ancestors: an introductory guide - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/researching-your-prison-ancestors-an-introductory-guide/

Tracing your police ancestors - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/police-ancestors/

Where to find criminal justice system records - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/where-to-find-criminal-justice-system-records/

Types of 'employment' & wages of prisoners in #Ripon House of Correction in 1872. Oakum picking had been introduced by the Governor, William Smith (formerly Sgt of the Ripon Police) in 1863. #NorthYorkshire @ourcriminalpast @prisonhistoryuk @CaPnetworkUK

@MAMBarLife @ourcriminalpast Yes. Ideally no windows, though some had small windows or grates for ventilation. Box Blind House is a true blind house - they managed to put the ventilation in the chimney https://tinyurl.com/eju6un9w

Finding a burial record is an important part of tracing your ancestor's story. Here's how to search the records of local cemeteries online

https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/tutorials/cemetery-records-online/

1. Another in our #LostPrisonsofDublin series. "New Newgate" opened in 1781 to replace "Old Newgate", the medieval city prison located in Cornmarket. Designed by Thomas Cooley, it was quickly seen as out-dated and overcrowded with poor ventilation and sanitation. (image DCC)

2

Although the Met had detectives from 1842, when the painter William Frith wanted 2 real life officers as models for his depiction of an arrest (right), he used Michael Haydon and James Brett of the City of London Police, 2 of the finest thief takers of the day #AVeryBritishMurder