Further reading

Books – Family History

Hawkings, David T. Criminal Ancestors: A Guide to Historic Criminal Records in England and Wales (Sutton Publishing, 1996).

Limbrick, Gudrun Jane. How to Research Childhoods Spent in Former Children’s Homes, Orphanages, Cottage Homes and Other Children’s Institutions (Wordworks, 2013).

Wade, Stephen. Tracing Your Criminal Ancestors: A Guide for Family Historians (Pen and Sword, 2009).

 

Books – Historical Context

Brown, Alyson. English Society and the Prison (The Boydell Press, 2003).

Cox, David J. Crime in England, 1688-1815 (Routledge, 2014).

Emsley, Clive. Crime and Society in England, 1750-1900 (Pearson, 2005); The English Police (Routledge, 1991); Crime and Society in Twentieth-Century England (Pearson, 2011).

Gray, Drew. Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1660-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2016).

Johnston, Helen. Crime in England, 1815-1880 (Routledge, 2015).

Sharpe, James A. Crime in Early Modern England 1550-1750 (Longman, 1998).

Shore, Heather. Artful Dodgers: Youth and Crime in Early Nineteenth-Century London (Boydell Press, 1999).

Taylor, David. Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1750-1914 (Palgrave, 1998); Hooligans, Harlots, and Hangmen: Crime and Punishment in Victorian Britain (Praeger, 2010).

 

Online

The National Archives: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

  • From the homepage click “Help with your research” then click “Criminals, courts and prisons”.

The Old Bailey Online: www.oldbaileyonline.org

The Digital Panopticon: www.digitalpanopticon.org

WaywardWomen: www.waywardwomen.wordpress.com

Africans in Yorkshire: www.africansinyorkshireproject.com

Children’s Homes: www.childrenshomes.org.uk

Former Children’s Homes: www.formerchildrenshomes.org.uk

The Workhouse: www.workhouses.org.uk

 

PhD theses

Balchin, Andrew. ‘The Justice of the Peace and County Government in the East Riding of Yorkshire, 1782-1836’ (Unpublished PhD Thesis, 1990). Available: https://hydra.hull.ac.uk/resources/hull:3760

Welsh, David. ‘The Reform of Urban Policing in Victorian England: A Study of Kingston upon Hull from 1836 to 1866’ (Unpublished PhD Thesis, 1997). Available: https://hydra.hull.ac.uk/resources/hull:4701

Latest Updates on Twitter

The recording of our recent Wilberforce Institute Debate - 'Not Made By Slaves' - is now available through our channel if you missed it. Hosted jointly with @FreetownSociety and the @UniOfHull, it discusses the recent monograph by @BronwenEverill. Click ➡️ https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/6211628678705217026

Half the tickets are sold already! If you want to join me making embroidered images, please book soon. https://twitter.com/CriminalQuilts/status/1305902239630921728

The 1916 leader Eamon Ceannt was born on this day, 21 September, 1881. He was very active in the Gaelic revival and played the uillean pipes. When performing he sometimes wore a traditional Irish costume which included a sporran, now in the Kilmainham Gaol collection.

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Today I finally finished one of the biggest tasks of my PhD. 3875 items collated from three asylum catalogues: each transcribed, sorted, cleaned up, individually researched to maximise information, & recategorised. Not too pretty, but ready for analysis!

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