Further reading

Books – Family History

Hawkings, David T. Criminal Ancestors: A Guide to Historic Criminal Records in England and Wales (Sutton Publishing, 1996).

Limbrick, Gudrun Jane. How to Research Childhoods Spent in Former Children’s Homes, Orphanages, Cottage Homes and Other Children’s Institutions (Wordworks, 2013).

Wade, Stephen. Tracing Your Criminal Ancestors: A Guide for Family Historians (Pen and Sword, 2009).

 

Books – Historical Context

Brown, Alyson. English Society and the Prison (The Boydell Press, 2003).

Cox, David J. Crime in England, 1688-1815 (Routledge, 2014).

Emsley, Clive. Crime and Society in England, 1750-1900 (Pearson, 2005); The English Police (Routledge, 1991); Crime and Society in Twentieth-Century England (Pearson, 2011).

Gray, Drew. Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1660-1914 (Bloomsbury, 2016).

Johnston, Helen. Crime in England, 1815-1880 (Routledge, 2015).

Sharpe, James A. Crime in Early Modern England 1550-1750 (Longman, 1998).

Shore, Heather. Artful Dodgers: Youth and Crime in Early Nineteenth-Century London (Boydell Press, 1999).

Taylor, David. Crime, Policing and Punishment in England, 1750-1914 (Palgrave, 1998); Hooligans, Harlots, and Hangmen: Crime and Punishment in Victorian Britain (Praeger, 2010).

 

Online

The National Archives: www.nationalarchives.gov.uk

  • From the homepage click “Help with your research” then click “Criminals, courts and prisons”.

The Old Bailey Online: www.oldbaileyonline.org

The Digital Panopticon: www.digitalpanopticon.org

WaywardWomen: www.waywardwomen.wordpress.com

Africans in Yorkshire: www.africansinyorkshireproject.com

Children’s Homes: www.childrenshomes.org.uk

Former Children’s Homes: www.formerchildrenshomes.org.uk

The Workhouse: www.workhouses.org.uk

 

PhD theses

Balchin, Andrew. ‘The Justice of the Peace and County Government in the East Riding of Yorkshire, 1782-1836’ (Unpublished PhD Thesis, 1990). Available: https://hydra.hull.ac.uk/resources/hull:3760

Welsh, David. ‘The Reform of Urban Policing in Victorian England: A Study of Kingston upon Hull from 1836 to 1866’ (Unpublished PhD Thesis, 1997). Available: https://hydra.hull.ac.uk/resources/hull:4701

Latest Updates on Twitter

This is a glorious thread fro Swansea Workhouse Punishment Book but this one had to be my favourite @Prison_Voices @TheirWrite @upsetvictorians https://t.co/sWOI3zUwnH

'I'd get a room at three bob a week and then enjoy meself — go to the theay-ter and that.'
Two poor lads overheard in 1895 in #Shoreditch discussing what they'd do if they earned £400 a year (a very good wage).

Explore Australian prisons through time #maps #crime #history #DH https://t.co/3TcNXfsZVf

More photos from @ourcriminalpast's excellent talk on the institutional & cultural history of borstal at @LeedsTownHall @Centrcultureart

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Illustration from A Report on Sanitary Conditions in #Preston by Rev. John Clay 1842. Your old friend @Traceyhughes200

My colleague Heather Shore @ourcriminalpast talking about the creation of the borstal system @Centrcultureart @becketthistory #CulturalConversation

Love these remarkable cartoons of Preston Lockout 1853 though of course rights of English workers pitted against Irish 'knobsticks' like this poor shoeless lass. From Preston Digital Archive on Flickr https://t.co/YcZ6MMlCA5

@cccjhull Professor Helen Johnston shares her experiences in developing @ourcriminalpast funded by @ahrcpress at @UniOfHull Digital Humanities workshop

Want to know more about the new @BritSocCrim Historical Criminology Network? The 'About' page on #HCNet should help: https://t.co/epqfuP3vwR
Want to know more about Historical Criminology generally? Network Chair @dchurchill01 says "it's about time...": https://t.co/SXXKJ2K82F

Check out Our Criminal Ancestors, a UK-based project that supports those exploring the criminal past of their families @ourcriminalpast #crimehist https://t.co/8p9886nxy9