Blogs

Five women – five families’ search for justice

November 20, 2019

A new book from the team behind hit BBC series Murder, Mystery and My Family features compelling true-crime stories of female killers and their families’ search for justice.

Find out more

Exploring female drunkenness in Victorian Lancashire

July 23, 2019

Utilising a range of archival sources, Dr Craig Stafford charts the criminal lives of drunken women in 19th century Lancashire.

Find out more

Tracing gang members – the complicated case of Charles ‘Darby’ Sabini

May 14, 2019

With the Peaky Blinders set to return to our screens later this year, Prof Heather Shore takes a look at the complicated lives of one of the families that has featured in the series, the Sabinis.

Find out more
graph

Figuring out the past: crime statistics as social history

March 4, 2019

What can crime statistics tell us about the past? Dr Ashley Borrett examines the interwar crime rates for Hull to find out more.

Find out more
cover of the Hull and East Riding source guide

WDYTYA? Our Criminal Ancestors in 50 Family History websites to watch in 2019

February 12, 2019

Our Criminal Ancestors features in Who Do You Think You Are? magazine’s 50 websites to watch in 2019.

Find out more

Discovering the truth about the lives of Robert Connolly

November 26, 2018

Researcher Eddie Mullan investigates the ‘lives’ of ancestor Robert Connolly, a man who turned out to have a colouful and criminal past.

Find out more
bundle of newspapers

Read all about it! Using newspapers in your crime research

September 24, 2018

Dr Ashley Borrett discusses the importance of newspapers when researching the history of crime.

Find out more
rows of boxes in an archives

National Archives: Collaboration between the Archive and Higher Education Sectors

July 13, 2018

Our Criminal Ancestors project is featured as a case study in a recent publication from the National Archives.

Find out more
person using a tablet

Why I’m a fan of using digital archives

April 11, 2014

A postgraduate student’s research experience by Stephen Basdeo, Leeds Trinity University.

Find out more
Social media

Our Criminal Past: digitisation, social media and crime history

May 17, 2013

Jo Turner reviews the first of three research networking workshops looking at the preservation and presentation of the criminal past.

Find out more

Latest Updates on Twitter

A riot caused by a clergyman’s violence http://thepolicemagistrate.blog/2019/11/29/a-riot-caused-by-a-clergymans-violence/

To find out more about this #Victorian poisoning case, pop into our library during opening hours and *lowers voice to a whisper* ask for London Collection Pamphlets, Box 76.
#MysteriousArchives #ExploreYourArchive

Today's #ExploreYourArchive theme is #ArchivesAtSea

We have a range of records relating to Newport Docks, including these photographs of the various goods being loaded and unloaded at the Docks.

(Ref: Pictorial/Newport67-68, 70 and 74)

4

Are you struggling to find information on staff or prisoners at a particular prison? Do you want to know more about the links between prisons and local communities? Check out our new guide on using the Census for prison research https://tinyurl.com/tyyrbwh ✒️📖🗝️

For #MysteriousArchives we have an intelligence file on suspected Irish Republican Brotherhood suspects compiled by the Chief Secretary’s Office, 1892-1893. It’s a mystery how they were secretly photographed in public places, perhaps using an early spy camera? @explorearchives

4

29 Nov 1686: John [Jack] Ketch public executioner who made a mess of many of his grim tasks is buried #otd at St. James Clerkenwell. Despite being paid for a speedy job, he took five blows to removed the head of the Duke of Monmouth.

@ourcriminalpast @channel5_tv @socialhistsoc @ResearchEssex #crime #historians may be interested in clips taken from the early 1900s film made about Charles Peace.

Look out for ‘Victorians in Colour’ in 2020 @channel5_tv. Just finished filming my contributions at the wonderful Whirled Cinema in Brixton. #twitterstorians @socialhistsoc @ResearchEssex

While we’re on the topic of Oliver Twist - Why don’t you take a look at Liverpool’s own workhouse, which stood on Brownlow Hill from 1834-1928.

The workhouse would be demolished in 1931, and replaced with, what is now, the Roman Catholic Church.