Blogs

Heroes and villains: conflicting attitudes to war veterans in peacetime

May 19, 2022

How real were the fears that brutalised and battle-scarred soldiers returning from the First World War had developed a propensity for violence and criminality? Dr Ashley Borrett looks at the city of Hull to find out how people responded to war veterans in peacetime.

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Oscar Wilde

19 May 1897 – Oscar Wilde is released from prison

May 19, 2022

19 May 2022 marks 125 years since Oscar Wilde was released from prison. Professor Helen Johnston recounts the criminal past of the notorious Irish poet and playwright.

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Criminal records as a way of introducing archives to children

August 25, 2021

Hannah Salisbury, Community and Learning Officer at Suffolk Archives, explains how new learning resources on crime and punishment are being used to introduce younger children to the fascinating world of historical archives.

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Taking a firm hand: dealing with juvenile delinquency in interwar Hull

August 24, 2021

The early part of the 20th century has been seen as a ‘progressive’ period in the punishment of young offenders. But as Dr Ashley Borrett reveals, even in this so-called enlightened era, old habits die hard.

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Reformatory and industrial training ships in nineteenth-century UK

March 31, 2021

Julie Brumby, from Leeds Beckett University, takes a look at the role reformatory and training ships played in dealing with juvenile criminality in the nineteenth century.

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Crime on the move in the early twentieth century

January 31, 2021

Dr Ashley Borrett examines the impact that the rise of the motor vehicle and the increase in transport-related crime had on attitudes to offending in the early part of the twentieth century.

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New portraits of the criminal past

May 26, 2020

The latest blogs from City Archivist, Phil Astley, who uses the fascinating collection of criminal ‘mugshots’ held by Aberdeen City and Aberdeenshire Archives and brings them to life, feature the cases of Neil McPherson, who was a prisoner at Perth, Peterhead and Pentonville, and Catherine Anderson, who was tried twice for child murder.

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Cot in a Victorian bedroom

Bastardy before the courts in nineteenth-century Hull

March 16, 2020

Dr Joanne Chilman looks at bastardy cases that came before the courts in Hull during the nineteenth century to reveal the rich history of the women and families involved in these courtroom trials.

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Crime, criminality and the provincial press

March 16, 2020

In his latest blog, Dr Ashley Borrett examines the pages of the provincial press and reveals the ‘voices’ of some of the key players in the crime and criminal justice debates of interwar Hull.

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Working in partnership with the Ripon Museums Trust

March 16, 2020

Professor Helen Johnston and Professor Heather Shore, from the Our Criminal Ancestors project, have been working with the Ripon Museums Trust on a number of projects over the past few years.

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Five women – five families’ search for justice

November 20, 2019

A new book from the team behind hit BBC series Murder, Mystery and My Family features compelling true-crime stories of female killers and their families’ search for justice.

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Exploring female drunkenness in Victorian Lancashire

July 23, 2019

Utilising a range of archival sources, Dr Craig Stafford charts the criminal lives of drunken women in 19th century Lancashire.

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Latest Updates on Twitter

Really hope ⁦@CityPolice⁩ make the right decision over the precious City of London Police Museum. These museums have so much to offer their forces ⁦@PoliceChiefs⁩ https://www.standard.co.uk/news/london/city-of-london-police-museum-risks-staying-closed-b1016904.html

It's GREAT to have another wonderful prison museum featured in our #CollectionoftheMonth. This time it's Dartmoor Prison Museum which tells the story of the infamous convict establishment. Find out more at https://www.capcollections.org.uk/home/cap-collections-of-the-month/

Roy Hackett was a civil rights hero – everyone in Britain should know his name | Olivette Otele https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/aug/03/roy-hackett-civil-rights-hero-britain-bristol-bus-boycott?CMP=share_btn_tw

Did you know that we also have dedicated World War I and World War II areas within Glenside Hospital Museum?

We’re open today for visitors from 10-1pm. No need to book tickets, we have space! 😊

#heritageisopen #bristol #bristolmuseums

📣 Our latest Archives e-newsletter dropped into subscribers' inboxes this week ➡️ https://orlo.uk/BoEjt
In this issue we look at a vengeful poem, a scrapbook donation relating to the Holmes family of Nunburnholme, the renowned tightrope dancers Nicolo & Antonio Plege, & more!

It’s Medieval Mayhem at the Museums Quarter this weekend!

Here’s what to expect… https://www.hcandl.co.uk/medieval-mayhem
#ACEsupported (1/10)

This image is shocking. Even more so next to an image of a Wandsworth prison cell from the late 1850s👇. The hand crank has gone, but little else has changed. As Dostoevsky famously wrote: 'The degree of civilization in a society can be judged by entering its prisons.' https://twitter.com/robroballen/status/1552908625013874691