Glossary

Acquit: Find not guilty.

Counterfeiting: Forgery, often of money.

Felony: a serious offence. Punishable by the death penalty.

Habitual Criminal: Defined by the 1869 Habitual Criminals Act as “suspicious persons” who had previously been convicted of more than one offence.

House of Correction: A prison where offenders accused of minor offences were put to hard labour.

Hulk: decommissioned war ship used to hold convicts prior to transportation.

Indictable offence: must be tried by a jury.

Indictment: Formal accusation charging someone with a crime. Takes the form of a written document containing brief details of the accusation.

Larceny: theft of personal property. Replaced as a statutory crime by theft in 1968.

Misdemeanour: A minor crime, which, unlike felonies, was not punishable by death.

Penal servitude: a long period of imprisonment

Penitentiary: Type of prison authorised by the 1779 Penitentiary Act, with strict discipline and hard labour, designed to reform as well as punish convicts.

Quarter Sessions: Courts held four times per year, presided over by Justices of the Peace where misdemeanors were tried.

Sessions Papers: Manuscript documents taken concerning accused criminals, which were kept by the courts and are now preserved in record offices.

Summary Jurisdiction: The power possessed by Justices of the Peace to try some types of crime acting alone, or in pairs, outside court, and to sentence those convicted to punishments.

Summary offence: tried by a magistrate only.

(The) Watch/Night Watch: Men who patrolled the streets at night to prevent crime.

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Criminal Portraits: January 2021 most recent blog from ⁦@AbdnArchives⁩ https://criminalportraits.blogspot.com/2021/01/

‘The weakness of the dangerous classes’: attitudes to poverty are at the heart of my teaching this term http://thepolicemagistrate.blog/2021/01/09/the-weakness-of-the-dangerous-classes-attitudes-to-poverty-are-at-the-heart-of-my-teaching-this-term/

Postcards from Ferris & Company, Druggists 💊 sent to Frederick Hurst Craddock, Medical Superintendent of the Gloucester County Asylum regarding orders ~ 1890 and 1891.

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Irish government to apologise over mother-and-baby homes https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-55622548

From Essex to Australia: the story of convict Jeremiah #crime #history http://www.criminalhistorian.com/from-essex-to-australia-the-story-of-convict-jeremiah/

Great to see this published and in good company - the other articles sound fascinating https://twitter.com/history_law/status/1346133769368072192