Glossary

Acquit: Find not guilty.

Counterfeiting: Forgery, often of money.

Felony: a serious offence. Punishable by the death penalty.

Habitual Criminal: Defined by the 1869 Habitual Criminals Act as “suspicious persons” who had previously been convicted of more than one offence.

House of Correction: A prison where offenders accused of minor offences were put to hard labour.

Hulk: decommissioned war ship used to hold convicts prior to transportation.

Indictable offence: must be tried by a jury.

Indictment: Formal accusation charging someone with a crime. Takes the form of a written document containing brief details of the accusation.

Larceny: theft of personal property. Replaced as a statutory crime by theft in 1968.

Misdemeanour: A minor crime, which, unlike felonies, was not punishable by death.

Penal servitude: a long period of imprisonment

Penitentiary: Type of prison authorised by the 1779 Penitentiary Act, with strict discipline and hard labour, designed to reform as well as punish convicts.

Quarter Sessions: Courts held four times per year, presided over by Justices of the Peace where misdemeanors were tried.

Sessions Papers: Manuscript documents taken concerning accused criminals, which were kept by the courts and are now preserved in record offices.

Summary Jurisdiction: The power possessed by Justices of the Peace to try some types of crime acting alone, or in pairs, outside court, and to sentence those convicted to punishments.

Summary offence: tried by a magistrate only.

(The) Watch/Night Watch: Men who patrolled the streets at night to prevent crime.

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⁦@prisonhistoryuk⁩ Watchet Court Leet Lock Up, Market St, Watchet, Nth Somerset. Court app still meets annually & ceremoniously ‘true men of Watchet’, at Bell Inn since 1643.

A doll dressed in the uniform of the Clifton Industrial School for Boys. Pupils at schools like these made uniforms for dolls that were then sold to raise money. In 1857 the law gave magistrates the power to send 7-14 yr olds to one of these institutions for vagrancy.
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On 29 July 1864, Solomon Allies was appointed as Borough Gaoler @tolhousemuseum
Great Yarmouth Local History & Archaeological Society have kindly given us permission to share an article about the last gaoler & predecessors at the Tolhouse.
Read full post http://ow.ly/JC4Y50AETWQ

@tolhousemuseum @timetidemuseum Very interesting article on last gaol keeper in Great Yarmouth @tolhousemuseum @prisonhistoryuk @ourcriminalpast

Great view of Glasgow Cross showing the tolbooth building before its demolition in 1921 Archive Ref: P9629
#Archivesathome #Glasgowlifegoeson

Was your ancestor punished by transported? Get started with guide for tracing your transported convict ancestor(s) - Our Criminal Ancestors #familyhistory #genealogy #ancestors https://ourcriminalancestors.org/source-guide-for-tracing-your-transported-convict-ancestorss/

Tracing your police ancestors? Some simple tips to get started - Our Criminal Ancestors #familyhistory #ancestors #genealogy https://ourcriminalancestors.org/police-ancestors/

Looking for introduction to where to find criminal justice system records - start here - Our Criminal Ancestors #familyhistory #genealogy #ancestors https://ourcriminalancestors.org/where-to-find-criminal-justice-system-records/

Researching your prison ancestors: an introductory guide - Our Criminal Ancestors #familyhistory #genealogy #ancestors https://ourcriminalancestors.org/researching-your-prison-ancestors-an-introductory-guide/