Participate with stories of your criminal, police or prison ancestors in our Historypin collections.

Historypin is a place for people to share photos and stories, telling the histories of their local communities. We use Historypin to map stories from the criminal past. We aim to build up a collection of criminal stories, not just from the UK, but from around the world.

Currently our collections include: 19th Century, 20th Century, Juvenile Crime and Women. But we welcome pin additions from you on any other crime-related subjects and themes. We are looking for stories and events between roughly 1700 and 1939 (lots of records are subject to closure of between 75-100 years).

Tell us (and each other) about crime history in your local area or your family history – we are interested in stories ‘big’ and ‘small’ – perhaps your ancestors was a police officer, prison warder or a witness to a crime, they may have been an offender or a victim – using crime history records can reveal some fascinating stories but also important contextual information about our social history.

If you would like to contribute, please watch the video ‘getting started’ on the Historypin website.

Please also tag your pin “criminalancestors”.

Follow this link to view our Historypin profile here and start adding your own criminal history pins:

Visit HistoryPin

Latest Updates on Twitter

Know your way around archival records? Fancy uncovering the history of security and the security industry? 🔐 Apply to join this exciting @ahrcpress project! Any queries, just get in touch @BritSocCrim @CCJSLeeds #HCNet #twitterstorians https://jobs.leeds.ac.uk/vacancy.aspx?ref=ESLLW1153

We've just put 32 new petitioners' stories online!

You'll find rebels, murderers, playhouse-managers, and Frenchmen, all trying to use the #PowerOfPetitioning to woo Charles II.

Read them for yourself here: https://petitioning.history.ac.uk/investigating-petitioners/petitioners-in-the-reign-of-charles-ii-1660-1685/

Tickets for our March @CrimSocHull @cccjhull @UniOfHull
Rising Star Guest Speaker: Dr Zoe Alker are now available. Don't miss out on your free online place.
Book now: https://bit.ly/3al2VyI 🚓

Public History Research Seminar, 4pm this Friday: Dr Gillian O'Brien, 'A Captive Audience: Prison Museums and Dark Tourism?' Email happhistseminars2021@gmail.com to attend. All Welcome! @gillianmobrien @HAPPatQUB @QUB_History @qubpublichist @LJMU

1/ Today's #lostprisonsofDublin is the City Marshalsea, a debtors prison which from 1704 to 1805 was located on Merchant’s Quay between Skipper's Lane and Swan Alley. The inmates would cry out to passers-by for charity to pay for their maintenance or discharge their debts.

If you missed our webinar on the subject of criminal mugshots, which was part of @GraniteNoirFest, you can catch up via this link:

Phil Astley - Criminal Portraits webinar - Granite Noir 2021 https://youtu.be/UFcOG_7Cv0I via @YouTube

18th century. Liverpool's most feared press gang leaders were 'Jack the Nabber' (a 'piratical-looking scoundrel') and 'Irish John' who led a 'motely crew of desperados'. They would invade brothels and inns to kidnap sailors in the face of strong opposition from the townspeople.

3

New boundary signs for the city went up at the weekend, so for #MapMonday here's a map of the city's boundaries in 1930. #Hull as yet to extend to its current area to the west and north.
@Hullccnews @Hull_Museums @hull_libraries

Our asylum team continues the story of Orlando Bridgeman, as concern grows at the family home of Weston Hall when letters about his condition continue to arrive. Read more https://staffordshireasylumrecords.wordpress.com/patients/ #staffsasylums (image Weston Hall, County Archaeology Dept/staffspasttrack.org.uk)