The main historic records of the criminal justice system can be found in the National Archives and local record offices.

The National Archives (TNA) holds the records of:

The National Archives holds a huge range of records available, many of which are also now digitised and available from www.findmypast.co.uk.

The best way to explore what is available at TNA is by using their excellent online guides. For example: Criminals and Convicts, Criminal Trials in the Assize Courts, 1559-1971 and Police.

Local Record Offices also hold some criminal justice and policing records. For example, these include

  • local and regional police and constabulary archives
  • records of the court (Assize, Quarter Sessions, Petty Sessions or Magistrates court)
  • local prison archives and reformatory and industrial school archives.

Survival and access can vary from archive to archive. Many record offices have excellent online information online (for example, the West Yorkshire Archives Service and the East Riding Archives Service).

Before you visit an archive make sure you read the guidance on the website. Many allow you to register and even order in advance, so it is worth doing some initial preparation before you go. Archive staff are usually happy to answer questions although you are advised to contact them in advance of your visit, especially for more complicated queries (see the Researching Here section for getting started at TNA).

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This is Kate Freke circa 1882. Born in 1863 she was the sister of Alfred Freke photographer of 253 Bute Street in Cardiff. Kate may well have developed this picture herself as she worked as photographers assistant in the studio for over 30 years. She married in 1916 & died 1939.

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Criminal Portraits: January 2021 most recent blog from ⁦@AbdnArchives⁩ https://criminalportraits.blogspot.com/2021/01/

‘The weakness of the dangerous classes’: attitudes to poverty are at the heart of my teaching this term http://thepolicemagistrate.blog/2021/01/09/the-weakness-of-the-dangerous-classes-attitudes-to-poverty-are-at-the-heart-of-my-teaching-this-term/

Postcards from Ferris & Company, Druggists 💊 sent to Frederick Hurst Craddock, Medical Superintendent of the Gloucester County Asylum regarding orders ~ 1890 and 1891.

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Irish government to apologise over mother-and-baby homes https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-55622548

From Essex to Australia: the story of convict Jeremiah #crime #history http://www.criminalhistorian.com/from-essex-to-australia-the-story-of-convict-jeremiah/

Great to see this published and in good company - the other articles sound fascinating https://twitter.com/history_law/status/1346133769368072192