The main historic records of the criminal justice system can be found in the National Archives and local record offices.

The National Archives (TNA) holds the records of:

The National Archives holds a huge range of records available, many of which are also now digitised and available from www.findmypast.co.uk.

The best way to explore what is available at TNA is by using their excellent online guides. For example: Criminals and Convicts, Criminal Trials in the Assize Courts, 1559-1971 and Police.

Local Record Offices also hold some criminal justice and policing records. For example, these include

  • local and regional police and constabulary archives
  • records of the court (Assize, Quarter Sessions, Petty Sessions or Magistrates court)
  • local prison archives and reformatory and industrial school archives.

Survival and access can vary from archive to archive. Many record offices have excellent online information online (for example, the West Yorkshire Archives Service and the East Riding Archives Service).

Before you visit an archive make sure you read the guidance on the website. Many allow you to register and even order in advance, so it is worth doing some initial preparation before you go. Archive staff are usually happy to answer questions although you are advised to contact them in advance of your visit, especially for more complicated queries (see the Researching Here section for getting started at TNA).

Latest Updates on Twitter

The recording of our recent Wilberforce Institute Debate - 'Not Made By Slaves' - is now available through our channel if you missed it. Hosted jointly with @FreetownSociety and the @UniOfHull, it discusses the recent monograph by @BronwenEverill. Click ➡️ https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/recording/6211628678705217026

Half the tickets are sold already! If you want to join me making embroidered images, please book soon. https://twitter.com/CriminalQuilts/status/1305902239630921728

The 1916 leader Eamon Ceannt was born on this day, 21 September, 1881. He was very active in the Gaelic revival and played the uillean pipes. When performing he sometimes wore a traditional Irish costume which included a sporran, now in the Kilmainham Gaol collection.

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🎇 Tuesday WelcomeFest is looking jam-packed! Here's what's coming up tomorrow...

These are student-only events, don't forget to pre-book with @HullUniUnion at the link below.

See all this and more:
➡️ http://www.hull.ac.uk/welcomefest

Today I finally finished one of the biggest tasks of my PhD. 3875 items collated from three asylum catalogues: each transcribed, sorted, cleaned up, individually researched to maximise information, & recategorised. Not too pretty, but ready for analysis!

If you missed any of the fascinating videos from last week's @heritageopenday you can catch up with all 14 from ourselves and @ERMuseums via this playlist on #YouTube 👉 🎥 🎞️

http://orlo.uk/o0DZI

#HiddenNature #BehindTheScenes #Archives #ExploreYourArchive @ARAUK_IE

Q: What do witches, railway workers and The Beatles all have in common?

A: They're all part of our new online events programme!

All of our talks are free and include a live Q&A with the speaker.
Browse and book the latest season now: http://orlo.uk/7Edkh

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