Industrial and Reformatory School Registers

Registers kept by Industrial and Reformatory Schools contain a great deal of information about the criminal and destitute children who were sent to these institutions from the mid-nineteenth century until 1933, when they were merged into the new approved schools under the Children and Young Person Act. Remember to bear in mind that these records can be closed up to 100 years so the records from the 1920s and early 1930s are unlikely to be open.

Both Industrial and Reformatory School Admissions Registers can contain a wide range of personal information and details about the crime or circumstances which led to the child being admitted. This information might include:

  • name
  • age
  • date of birth
  • date of admission
  • with what charged
  • criminal history
  • trade or occupation
  • period of detention
  • previous character
  • religion
  • name of parents
  • occupation of parents
  • address of parents
  • educational attainment
  • physical description, sometimes including a photograph.

Industrial and Reformatory School registers and other records can be found in both local record offices and at the National Archives, so it helps to check both.

For example, the admission registers, school returns, and discharge and licence registers of Bradwell Reformatory in Cheshire are held the National Archives, but minutes, committee paper and correspondence, are held at the Cheshire Archives. In contrast, the records of the Leeds Reformatory (later the East Moor Approved School) are held in the local record office.

Some industrial and reformatory schools’ records have been digitised. For example, records held at the West Yorkshire Archives relating to industrial and reformatory schools (including Leeds Reformatory School, Calder Farm Reformatory, and Shadwell Industrial School) have been digitised and made available (for a fee) at Ancestry.co.uk. Similarly, the registers of the Manchester Industrial School are available on Findmypast.co.uk.

Download a guide to Industrial and Reformatory Schools sources

Latest Updates on Twitter

Another moment in #maritime #history the #SpurnLightship leaves #Hull #Marina after 34 years and heads down the River Humber ⁦ahead of her preservation work and onward journey @HullMaritime
see more @yorkshirepost https://tinyurl.com/h4fyh2x2
@DunstonShipLtd
#HullYMC @HeritageFundNOR

4

Celebrating the Centenary of the Howard League for Penal Reform & the Howard Journal: Vol 60, No S1 open access articles from ⁦@sysgak⁩ @ourcriminalpast⁩ ⁦@HistorianCrime⁩ ⁦@ashleytrubin⁩ & many others! ⁦@howard_journal⁩ ⁦ https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/20591101/current

This Thursday we celebrate 100 years of the Howard Journal. A host of fantastic experts will join us to discuss long-standing and contemporary issues in crime & justice, including @sysgak @mdhanuka17 @jonbcollins @ashleytrubin @ourcriminalpast Register at: https://howardleague.org/events/100-years-of-the-howard-journal-lessons-for-contemporary-penal-policy/

So excited to see a sneak preview of @RachelDixonGood's excellent book "Infanticide: Expert Evidence and Testimony in Child Murder Cases, 1688-1955" is already available before it is published next month!! 🤩🥳 Check it out here:
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=vcBEEAAAQBAJ&newbks=0&printsec=frontcover&pg=PP5&dq=Rachel+Dixon+infanticide&hl=en&source=newbks_fb&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q=Rachel%20Dixon%20infanticide&f=false

This photograph from our collection was taken from what is now our car park and shows the restoration of bottle oven No 4 in 1978.
#PhotoFriday
#Stokeontrent #bottleovens #ceramics #pottery #industrtialheritage

Based on her excellent PhD @lawhulluni (supervised by @ourcriminalpast), this provides an invaluable long duree analysis of how expert witness testimony was variously shaped, accepted and denigrated in infanticide cases heard in London and Hull between the late 17th & mid-20th C

Early boys from the black stuff, roadmaking in Liverpool 1890.
Literally, a load of cobblers today
https://liverpoolmiscellany.blogspot.com/2021/09/boys-from-black-stuff.html

2

(Left) Major John James Grieg, Head Constable of Liverpool from 1852-1881. (Right) Liverpool's Main Bridewell on Cheapside. Major Grieg would visit here on Sunday afternoons to loudly reprimand drunk and disorderly prisoners in the manner of the parade ground. @ourcriminalpast

2