January 25, 2019

Funding Justice or Fuelling Crime? The Political Economy of Crime and Justice in Historical Perspective

Leeds Historical Criminology Seminar

10.45 to 16.00

Maurice Keyworth Building, Business School, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT.

This event focuses on the interconnections between politics, the economy, crime and criminal justice in historical perspective. We are delighted to welcome four distinguished scholars – Prof. Pamela CoxDr Ruth LamontProf. Stephen Farrall and Dr Zelia Gallo – whose expertise straddles criminology, sociology, law and history.

Their presentations will concern access to justice for victims of crime, the impact of Thatcherite social and economic policies on crime and criminal justice, and the long-term penal implications of the Eurozone crisis and the politics of austerity. A concluding roundtable will draw upon these papers to stimulate wider reflection on the political economy of crime and justice – past, present and future.

This free event is part of a seminar series that aims to showcase the potential of historical perspectives to enrich understandings of crime, criminal justice and related issues in the present as well as the past.

It provides a platform for academics, students, practitioners and others to engage with the latest relevant research from across a range of academic disciplines. In doing so, the series aims to build linkages across academic disciplines and advance a shared appreciation of how historical research can transform our understanding of crime and social responses to crime today and into the future.

Lunch will be provided for all delegates. The draft schedule, with a title and abstract for each paper can be found here.

The seminar series is organised by Dr David Churchill, Prof. Heather Shore and Dr Henry Yeomans and is hosted jointly by the University of Leeds and Leeds Beckett University. This event is kindly supported by the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies, University of Leeds.

Register

Latest Updates on Twitter

Actually this from 1947 is also pretty familiar then reflecting fears of ‘open’ prisons @YvonneJewkes @carceralgeog @drjamiebennett @crewebencrewe @drdommoran @tcguiney

On next page of scrapbook ‘prison staff complain of attacks’ and another story ‘hose turned on 100 boys: disturbance in approved school’ 1945 @YvonneJewkes @carceralgeog @drjamiebennett @crewebencrewe @drdommoran @tcguiney

Today I’m reading newspapers strikingly familiar tone ... ‘Blow up the Old Gaols’ Home Sec Morrison plans ‘revolution in the penal system, scrapping all the old prisons & the old methods’ Year? 1944 @YvonneJewkes @carceralgeog @drjamiebennett @crewebencrewe @drdommoran @tcguiney

This lovely picture shows a charwoman in 1855. A charwoman was a part-time cleaner, different to a maid in that they did not live in the house. Were any of your ancestors domestic servants?
Ref DE/Bi/4/54 #archives #servant #photography

Prison Service Journal: 246 ⁦@PSJ_UK⁩ great to see this new collection of historical perspectives on prison from ⁦@RhiannonPickin⁩ ⁦@allan_brodie54⁩ ⁦@tcguiney⁩ edited by ⁦@interwarcrime⁩ and Alana Barton https://www.crimeandjustice.org.uk/publications/psj/prison-service-journal-246

NEW policy paper - Historical content matters: a response to the critical thinking skills agenda by @KatieEBarclay http://www.historyandpolicy.org/policy-papers/papers/historical-content-matters-a-response-to-the-critical-thinking-skills-agenda

Martin Waters poignant poppy displays return to @HullMinster, as we remember those who gave so much. The installation is at the Minster until the end of November.

Our @histassoc Teacher Fellowship has been inspired by the excellent @teachlearnwar & @ein_haus research on WWI in the classroom, and informed by excellent new work by @JJtodd1966

Teachers – has the First World War centenary given your teaching a creative boost?

#LestWeForget

#Barmouth Roundhouse, 1833. This lock-up held 2 drunks - having a curtain wall to separate males and females. Its circular design was to 'make sure that the Devil would have no corners to hide in!' More info: https://buff.ly/2Nv9diD #prisonhistory #lockup

Back in the murder files I've been reading the heart-rending accounts of the systematic abuse of young men at sea, which often resulted in death. Bodies were often buried overseas, which made bringing the perpetrators to justice difficult. #detectivehistory #PhD