January 25, 2019

Funding Justice or Fuelling Crime? The Political Economy of Crime and Justice in Historical Perspective

Leeds Historical Criminology Seminar

10.45 to 16.00

Maurice Keyworth Building, Business School, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT.

This event focuses on the interconnections between politics, the economy, crime and criminal justice in historical perspective. We are delighted to welcome four distinguished scholars – Prof. Pamela CoxDr Ruth LamontProf. Stephen Farrall and Dr Zelia Gallo – whose expertise straddles criminology, sociology, law and history.

Their presentations will concern access to justice for victims of crime, the impact of Thatcherite social and economic policies on crime and criminal justice, and the long-term penal implications of the Eurozone crisis and the politics of austerity. A concluding roundtable will draw upon these papers to stimulate wider reflection on the political economy of crime and justice – past, present and future.

This free event is part of a seminar series that aims to showcase the potential of historical perspectives to enrich understandings of crime, criminal justice and related issues in the present as well as the past.

It provides a platform for academics, students, practitioners and others to engage with the latest relevant research from across a range of academic disciplines. In doing so, the series aims to build linkages across academic disciplines and advance a shared appreciation of how historical research can transform our understanding of crime and social responses to crime today and into the future.

Lunch will be provided for all delegates. The draft schedule, with a title and abstract for each paper can be found here.

The seminar series is organised by Dr David Churchill, Prof. Heather Shore and Dr Henry Yeomans and is hosted jointly by the University of Leeds and Leeds Beckett University. This event is kindly supported by the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies, University of Leeds.

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Latest Updates on Twitter

Researching Criminal Ancestors - Hornsea & District Civic Society - Our Criminal Ancestors - looking forward to this talk on Weds evening. #crimhist https://t.co/ytDqgaGb5S

This week's female convict on display in British prison museums is Phoebe Harris, who was burnt at the stake outside of Newgate prison in 1786 for counterfeiting coins. She is on display in a video at @JusticeMuseum #WomensHistoryMonth #publichistory #museums #crimehistory

Help transcribe prison record of Dennis Corbett convicted of larceny in 1873 at 14 years old #crimehistory #childhist https///criminalcharacters.com/.jpg

Up bright & early to welcome @BBCYork to @RiponMuseums to chat to them about our new exhibition Secrets in the Cellar

Send a little girl named Rose Ann Reilly, aged nine years to St. Joseph’s Industrial School, until she attains the age of sixteen years. She was frequently found begging on the streets of the town at late hours. Northern Whig - Wednesday 06 August 1924

This weekend I got see the new 'Road to Recovery' exhibition by the @wyorksarchives, which focuses on the Stanley Royd Asylum. It was great, and I was struck by how the issue of surveillance dominated the institution's design - v. similar to penal structures.

Fyi @MrsAlghrani @lucie_wade @ourcriminalpast @AnnaLoisMckay https://t.co/DZCVEbu0UQ

trespass in search of game 1891 #Hampshire Observer Mar 3rd @HantsArchives defendants said they were hunting #hedgehogs 🦔🦔🦔Fined 3s each and 7s costs @hedgehogsociety @WildlifeOrphan1 @hedgehogreview @ourcriminalpast @thevicsoc @HantsPolHistory @RuralCrimeTeam @ChrisGPackham

Research Associate in Modern History at University of Bristol https://t.co/kiMkv5h5wM #twitterstorians

Another mock blue plaque has appeared in Hull - this time @alternaheritage have done one for John Venn next to the Drypool Bridge. The series of plaques celebrate local quirks & people.