January 25, 2019

Funding Justice or Fuelling Crime? The Political Economy of Crime and Justice in Historical Perspective

Leeds Historical Criminology Seminar

10.45 to 16.00

Maurice Keyworth Building, Business School, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT.

This event focuses on the interconnections between politics, the economy, crime and criminal justice in historical perspective. We are delighted to welcome four distinguished scholars – Prof. Pamela CoxDr Ruth LamontProf. Stephen Farrall and Dr Zelia Gallo – whose expertise straddles criminology, sociology, law and history.

Their presentations will concern access to justice for victims of crime, the impact of Thatcherite social and economic policies on crime and criminal justice, and the long-term penal implications of the Eurozone crisis and the politics of austerity. A concluding roundtable will draw upon these papers to stimulate wider reflection on the political economy of crime and justice – past, present and future.

This free event is part of a seminar series that aims to showcase the potential of historical perspectives to enrich understandings of crime, criminal justice and related issues in the present as well as the past.

It provides a platform for academics, students, practitioners and others to engage with the latest relevant research from across a range of academic disciplines. In doing so, the series aims to build linkages across academic disciplines and advance a shared appreciation of how historical research can transform our understanding of crime and social responses to crime today and into the future.

Lunch will be provided for all delegates. The draft schedule, with a title and abstract for each paper can be found here.

The seminar series is organised by Dr David Churchill, Prof. Heather Shore and Dr Henry Yeomans and is hosted jointly by the University of Leeds and Leeds Beckett University. This event is kindly supported by the Centre for Criminal Justice Studies, University of Leeds.

Register

Latest Updates on Twitter

Want to know how to find and understand pauper letters? webinar by @TheirWrite @UkNatArchives showing how we kind find the voices of the poor in these remarkable sources Tue 22 January 2019
18:00 – 19:00 CET https://t.co/yXcA2rlAyx

The final essay associated with the now complete @ERC_Research project 'The Carceral Archipelago' is published at https://t.co/bQBk0yfjJo. It's on covert convict transportation from small Germany states, and is open access. Author: @kinkirarufu

Lovely audience last night for my talk on the Sarah Jacob case in the magnificent "Iron Room" at Egwlys Fach. It nets another donation for @PrisonersAbroad
If you don't know the case check out the Welsh Legal History Soc website.

Society News: Our chair @ProfPamelaCox has been invited to speak at an event discussing research using social care records. You can find out more (and book a free place) here:

https://t.co/HLqlpI2X9B

Reminder: the next Leeds Historical Criminology Seminar is on 25 Jan, setting austerity, political economy and criminal justice in historical perspective with stellar guest speakers - register here: https://t.co/KQ5CnZ9a1b @CCJSLeeds @Law_Leeds @TimNewburn @BritSocCrim #HCNet

Happy New Year. Edge Hill is currently advertising a range of Graduate teaching posts. I would love to hear from students interested in researching crime/punishment from the Victorian era to 1939.
https://t.co/GjmD8AFTb8

We're getting very close to the deadline now. There are just few more days to get your ideas in for our 2019 conference! https://t.co/UQEV7zPORp

Up to Six Fully-funded PhD Studentships in Heritage Studies with the Heritage Consortium https://t.co/KBKmHymvG7