The latest issue of the Prison Service Journal offers historical perspectives on prison and criminal justice issues nationally and locally, with a range of articles focusing on aspects of imprisonment reaching from penal reform to prison financing systems.

  • Allan Brodie analyses English prison planning predominantly between 1780 and 1850, which was a period when prisons were becoming more centralised.
  • Rhiannon Pickin makes up for the historical deficit of studies on suicides in prison by examining suicide in York Castle gaol between 1824 to 1836.
  • Regimes to rehabilitate women in prison, whether in the 19th century or now, serve broader interests than women’s empowerment, according to Helen Elfleet in an article examining gender specific reformist regimes.

Read the latest edition of the Prison Service Journal.

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Researching your prison ancestors: an introductory guide - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/researching-your-prison-ancestors-an-introductory-guide/

Tracing your police ancestors - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/police-ancestors/

Where to find criminal justice system records - Our Criminal Ancestors #AncestryHour https://ourcriminalancestors.org/where-to-find-criminal-justice-system-records/

Types of 'employment' & wages of prisoners in #Ripon House of Correction in 1872. Oakum picking had been introduced by the Governor, William Smith (formerly Sgt of the Ripon Police) in 1863. #NorthYorkshire @ourcriminalpast @prisonhistoryuk @CaPnetworkUK

@MAMBarLife @ourcriminalpast Yes. Ideally no windows, though some had small windows or grates for ventilation. Box Blind House is a true blind house - they managed to put the ventilation in the chimney https://tinyurl.com/eju6un9w

Finding a burial record is an important part of tracing your ancestor's story. Here's how to search the records of local cemeteries online

https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/tutorials/cemetery-records-online/

1. Another in our #LostPrisonsofDublin series. "New Newgate" opened in 1781 to replace "Old Newgate", the medieval city prison located in Cornmarket. Designed by Thomas Cooley, it was quickly seen as out-dated and overcrowded with poor ventilation and sanitation. (image DCC)

2

Although the Met had detectives from 1842, when the painter William Frith wanted 2 real life officers as models for his depiction of an arrest (right), he used Michael Haydon and James Brett of the City of London Police, 2 of the finest thief takers of the day #AVeryBritishMurder