The latest issue of the Prison Service Journal offers historical perspectives on prison and criminal justice issues nationally and locally, with a range of articles focusing on aspects of imprisonment reaching from penal reform to prison financing systems.

  • Allan Brodie analyses English prison planning predominantly between 1780 and 1850, which was a period when prisons were becoming more centralised.
  • Rhiannon Pickin makes up for the historical deficit of studies on suicides in prison by examining suicide in York Castle gaol between 1824 to 1836.
  • Regimes to rehabilitate women in prison, whether in the 19th century or now, serve broader interests than women’s empowerment, according to Helen Elfleet in an article examining gender specific reformist regimes.

Read the latest edition of the Prison Service Journal.

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Would like to become a member or a volunteer of the National Civilian World War 2 Memorial Trust (NCWW2MT) to help make the conservation of the National Picture Theatre a reality? If so, register your interest ➡️ https://bit.ly/2RxYjey

Closing date is 30 September.

Do you find family history webinars useful? Family Tree Webinars are making their programme of online talks FREE to view until 24 September - it's the perfect chance to brush up on your research skills!

https://familytreewebinars.com/intermediate_page.php?diply_nm=top10

View of #Hull from the docks taken from ‘The Century’s Progress - Yorkshire’ (1893) - ‘An Illustrated account of Yorkshire's industrial and commercial life in the 19th century’ Interesting descriptions of some of the the county’s #Victorian businesses #Yorkshire

Coming soon! @ihr_history's first ever #MOOC (free open online course) from @CHPPC_IHR, with @UoLondon Worldwide & @Coursera: Applied #PublicHistory: Places, People, Stories. Discover fascinating stories, learn from amazing projects, build your own toolkit. October 2020.

London's #policehistory is often to be found in unexpected places, such as @FoundlingMuseum in @MPSHolborn where #OnThisDay in 1829 the Commissioners swore in the first batch of Met constables, thirteen days before they were first sent out on patrol. #OnThisDayInHistory #OTD

The Tolhouse in Great Yarmouth was used as a gaol from the middle of the 1200s. Some of its earliest prisoners were put in The Hold, a dark, filthy & cramped cellar. Find out more: https://tinyurl.com/y59qfuzy #Tolhouse60 @NorfolkMuseums @timetidemuseum

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There aren't many upsides to covid-19, but one of them is The National Archives opening up thousands of their online family history records for free! Here's how to make the most of this opportunity!

https://www.whodoyouthinkyouaremagazine.com/tutorials/how-to-make-the-most-of-free-online-family-history-records-from-the-national-archives/

Intrigued by my work with prisoner images & textiles? Fancy having a go yourself? New online workshop Embroidered Images is open for bookings now. It takes place on Saturday 14th November.
Find out more and book here: https://ruthsinger.com/criminalquilts/criminal-herstories/talks-and-events/criminal-quilts-embroidered-images-online-workshop-with-ruth-singer/