Journal

March 2015 saw the online publication of the Our Criminal Past special issue of Law, Crime and History.

We are indebted to the authors for their contributions, and to Kim Stevenson and Judith Rowbotham for their support of the network.

Law, Crime and History, Volume 5, Issue 1 (2015), Special Edition: Our Criminal Past – Caring for the Future

Guest Editors: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston

Contents:

Preface: Barry Godfrey, pp.1-4

Introduction: Heather Shore and Helen Johnston, ‘Thinking about the Future of Our Criminal Past’, pp.5-11

Digital Histories of Crime

Sharon Howard, ‘Bloody Code: Reflecting on a Decade of the Old Bailey Online and the Digital Futures of Our Criminal Past’, pp.12-24

Hamish Maxwell Stewart, Matthew Cracknell, and Kris Inwood, ‘Height, Crime and Colonial History’, pp.25-42

Blogging Crime Histories

Lucy Williams, ‘Writing Wayward Women: Why Blog the History of Victorian England’s Female Offenders?’ pp.43-53

Helen Rogers, ‘Blogging Our Criminal Past: Social Media, Public Engagement and Creative History’, pp.54-76

Teaching Digital History

Zoe Alker, ‘The Digital Classroom: New Social Media and Teaching Victorian Crime’, pp.77-92

Andrew Davies, Mark Peel and Laura Balderstone, ‘Digital Histories of Crime and Research-Based Teaching and Learning’, pp.93-104

Presenting Crime and Policing Histories

Beth Wilburn, ‘Narrating ‘Our Criminal Past’ at Greater Manchester Police Museum and Archives in the Context of the UK Government Funded Tackling Knives Action Programme (TKAP) 2009-2011’, pp.105-116

Dorian Knight, ‘On the Beat: Stories from 1914-1918: A Fresh Approach to interpreting Crime History at Bishop’s Stortford Museum’, pp.117-129

Debate and Discussion

Richard W. Ireland, ‘Why Everything We Know About Criminal Justice History is Wrong’, pp.130-142

Book Reviews

David J. Cox, ‘An Eye For An Eye: A Global History of Crime and Punishment’, pp.143-144

Judith Rowbotham, ‘Sex, Crime and Literature in Victorian England’, pp.145-148

Dean Wilson, Policing Twentieth Century Ireland: A History of An Garda Síochána, pp.149-151

Law, Crime & History

Latest Updates on Twitter

A lovely summary of our recent event with @UkNatArchives on collaboration with archives & HE from Kate the Librarian! Nice to see a mention of @ourcriminalpast too https://t.co/AA8n3N51aS #twitterstorians

Whilst I am on holiday, taking a break from writing about courtroom and prison museums for my thesis, I still made sure to visit the Memorium Nuremberg Trials. A very different kind of courtroom museum compared to the ones I’m used to seeing. #darktourism

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Fantastic talk today at the @WMPolice #Lockup by Kay Hunter on capital punishment after another busy open day with #AFairCop book display. One step closer to fully fledged police museum 😃

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4 days until Echoes of Holloway Prison Exhibition opens! Counting down our 5 Questions that are part of the Exhibition https://t.co/jAp3hEXE0W so here is 👇🏾👇🏼👇🏽
Q2. "Does prison work for women?"

Fascinated with historical clothing? The get down to #StoneLibrary on 17th July to hear artist Ruth Singer talk about criminal clothing @CriminalQuilts Free to attend #DontMissOut

Read articles on historical criminology in the summer @BritSocCrim Newsletter from the brilliant @dchurchill01 @blalygamal @iainchanning and @yeomans_henry https://t.co/z8CdMYx8ud

COME AND JOIN THE HISTORY LAB COMMITTEE! Elections July 12th at 5pm. Interested? email: ihrhistorylab@gmail.com

This is a great opportunity for PhDs at whatever stage of research. As the academic job market becomes ever more competitive, involvement in an organisation such as History Lab represents a valuable addition to your CV.

Call for Papers for the upcoming symposium on how immersive experience of #heritage shapes our understanding of the modern world.
https://t.co/yep6IN3y2G