Issue No 215, September 2014 – available at:

http://www.crimeandjustice.org.uk/publications/psj/prison-service-journal-215

This special issue of the Prison Service Journal draws together a number of short articles and interviews with those involved with and affected by the closures and opening of prisons in England and Wales in the last few years.  The issue seeks to explore the impact and effects of closures and openings of prison on those who work in and manage prisons, those who are confined within them, as well as on the relationships that these prisons have with the wider communities in which they exist.  The guest editor, Paul Crossey, Head of Young People at HMYOI Feltham, and the various contributors bring together the collective experience of both closures and opening of prisons; documenting not only the decision making and its impacts on those within the closed prisons but also the challenges posed by new prison environments and the establishment of communities within them.

The first short article focuses on some of the older prisons that have been closed in the last two or three years, highlighting a little about their individual stories and the place of these prisons within a broader understanding of the history of imprisonment and changing penal estate.  I hope that it also provides some context for the interviews with the staff and prisoners from some of these closed prisons that follow.

You may also be interested in ‘The Prison and the Public’, Prison Service Journal, Special Issue edited by Alana Barton and Alyson Brown (both at Edge Hull University), Issue No 214, July 2014 available at:

http://www.crimeandjustice.org.uk/publications/psj/prison-service-journal-214

Professor Helen Johnston, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, University of Hull

This article was previously published on the Our Criminal Past website in 2013.

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This is a glorious thread fro Swansea Workhouse Punishment Book but this one had to be my favourite @Prison_Voices @TheirWrite @upsetvictorians https://t.co/sWOI3zUwnH

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Two poor lads overheard in 1895 in #Shoreditch discussing what they'd do if they earned £400 a year (a very good wage).

Explore Australian prisons through time #maps #crime #history #DH https://t.co/3TcNXfsZVf

More photos from @ourcriminalpast's excellent talk on the institutional & cultural history of borstal at @LeedsTownHall @Centrcultureart

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Illustration from A Report on Sanitary Conditions in #Preston by Rev. John Clay 1842. Your old friend @Traceyhughes200

My colleague Heather Shore @ourcriminalpast talking about the creation of the borstal system @Centrcultureart @becketthistory #CulturalConversation

Love these remarkable cartoons of Preston Lockout 1853 though of course rights of English workers pitted against Irish 'knobsticks' like this poor shoeless lass. From Preston Digital Archive on Flickr https://t.co/YcZ6MMlCA5

@cccjhull Professor Helen Johnston shares her experiences in developing @ourcriminalpast funded by @ahrcpress at @UniOfHull Digital Humanities workshop

Want to know more about the new @BritSocCrim Historical Criminology Network? The 'About' page on #HCNet should help: https://t.co/epqfuP3vwR
Want to know more about Historical Criminology generally? Network Chair @dchurchill01 says "it's about time...": https://t.co/SXXKJ2K82F

Check out Our Criminal Ancestors, a UK-based project that supports those exploring the criminal past of their families @ourcriminalpast #crimehist https://t.co/8p9886nxy9