Issue No 215, September 2014

This special issue of the Prison Service Journal draws together a number of short articles and interviews with those involved with and affected by the closures and opening of prisons in England and Wales in the last few years.ย  The issue seeks to explore the impact and effects of closures and openings of prison on those who work in and manage prisons, those who are confined within them, as well as on the relationships that these prisons have with the wider communities in which they exist.ย  The guest editor, Paul Crossey, Head of Young People at HMYOI Feltham, and the various contributors bring together the collective experience of both closures and opening of prisons; documenting not only the decision making and its impacts on those within the closed prisons but also the challenges posed by new prison environments and the establishment of communities within them.

The first short article focuses on some of the older prisons that have been closed in the last two or three years, highlighting a little about their individual stories and the place of these prisons within a broader understanding of the history of imprisonment and changing penal estate.ย  I hope that it also provides some context for the interviews with the staff and prisoners from some of these closed prisons that follow.

You may also be interested in ‘The Prison and the Public’, Prison Service Journal, Special Issue edited by Alana Barton and Alyson Brown (both at Edge Hull University), Issue No 214, July 2014.

By Professor Helen Johnston, Senior Lecturer in Criminology, University of Hull

This article was previously published on the Our Criminal Past website in 2013.

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@demon_drink @ourcriminalpast In 1891 Harry Dainton was convicted of drowning Hannah, his wife, in the River Avon. Hannah liked a drink &, whilst Harry was no saint, after finding her again in the pub it looked like he simply lost it. Leaving behind 6 children, one of whom was blind & died in the Workhouse.

At the start of the new year, why not brush up on your family history courses with an online course? We take a look at the latest courses available now, covering family history software, printed sources in family history and more

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COMING SOON: Explore the county's historical connection to the many diseases & epidemics that have affected Hertfordshire since the 1300s in our new online talk FEVER
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Did you miss our panel discussion on the 1921 Census earlier this week? Don't worry you can still join the conference, watch a recording of this week's session and join us live on 13 and 20 January. Find out more and get your conference bundle ticket here: https://www.family-tree.co.uk/how-to-guides/1921-census/celebratory-1921-census-conference/

#Census1921 ๐Ÿ“œ๐Ÿ–‹ When was the 1921 census taken? Where can you find the records? And what do they show you? @wdytyamagazine explores the latest family history resource ๐Ÿ‘‰ https://buff.ly/3eTD6as

More women were employed in personal service than in any other sector in #1921Census . Find out more with @SocGenealogists best seller book My Ancestor was in Service

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Today's #DryJanuary #temperance image is from a radical journal 'The Progressionist' in 1852, showing a path of alcohol addiction; the pawnbroker, the pub, and then a choice between the workhouse and prison - melodramatic, yes, but it reflected many real-life stories.

At Saltburn 'the bathing machines, wooden ones with high wheels and steps leading up to them stand yet in a long row near the Ship Inn with their wheels deeply embedded in the soft sand.' 'Yorkshire Tour' by Pontefract and Hartley (1939)